Welcome

Welcome to the website of the Hull and East Riding Humanist Group. Our group provides an opportunity for like-minded people to meet and discuss humanist values, principles and related subjects and to promote an awareness of the philosophy of humanism to the wider public. The past decade has seen a significant increase in the number of local groups springing up around the country and although the Hull and East Riding group is small in size (about a dozen regular attendees) we think that there is every reason to hope that the number of people adopting a humanist world-view will increase with time. If you would like to ask any questions about humanism or the activities of our group, please email Tim Stephenson, the group secretary (tim.stephenson@herhg.org.uk).

Next meeting: Monday 27th October 2014

Tiger Inn Map

Our meetings are on the fourth Monday of every month. The next meeting of the HERHG will be at 7.30pm on Monday 27th October 2014 in the back room of  The Tiger Inn, Lairgate, Beverley, East Yorkshire, HU17 8JG. Whether you’ve been to one of our meetings before or not, why not pop down for a drink, something to eat and a chat about humanism?

About Us

We had our first meeting on 15th September 2008.  We have regular meetings advertised on this website. Other activities include meals out, a summer BBQ and a walk in the countryside. We also ran a succesfull campaign to have the well-known Scientist, Humanist and Broadcaster Jacob Bronowski recognised with a commemorative blue heritage plaque at his former home in Cottingham. Jacob Bronowski lived and taught in Hull in 1940 and made the TV documentary the Ascent of Man in 1973.

What is Humanism?

Humanism is the belief that we can live good lives without religious or superstitious beliefs. Humanists make sense of the world using reason, experience and shared human values. We seek to make the best of the one life we have by creating meaning and purpose for ourselves. We take responsibility for our actions and work with others for the common good.Humanism encompasses atheism and agnosticism but is an active and ethical philosophy far greater than these negative responses to religion. The 2011 Census showed a large increase in the number of people in our region stating explicitly that they had no religion (25% of the population).

How do we know what is true?

What should we think about death?

What makes something right or wrong?

How can I be happy?

 

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